Political Print Exhibitions at AMUM

by - October 06, 2018

HERE AND NOW: PRINTMAKING AND THE POLITICAL PRESENT

On view: October 8 - November 9, 2018
Reception: October 12, 5-7 PM


Here and Now: Printmaking and the Political Present is an exhibition of prints by Memphis-based artists exploring social issues of our contemporary moment. Artists include Maritza Dávila, Vanessa González-Hernández, Nelson Gutierrez, Lawrence Matthews, Carl Moore, Joel Parsons, Jennifer Sargent, and Yancy Villa-Calvo.

Master printmaker Maritza Dávila has led artists in a series of workshops formulating concepts and producing the prints on view. Artists explore topics such as gentrification, climate change, gun violence, queer politics, immigration, education, and non-violent protest in their work.

The exhibition runs concurrently with Freedom of the Press: Posters from Progressive Print Shops, 1960s-1990s, an exhibition organized by the Center for the Study of Political Graphics in Los Angeles, California.
Above: Vanessa González-Hernández, No Child Left Behind, 2018. Screenprint on paper. Courtesy of the artist.



FREEDOM OF THE PRESS: POSTERS FROM PROGRESSIVE PRINT SHOPS, 1960s-1990s

On view: October 8 - November 9, 2018
Reception: October 12, 5-7 PM


Oppositional presses have been challenging the status quo in the United States since Benjamin Franklin helped form the first printers' union in the colonial period. From Quaker broadsides against slavery to posters supporting affirmative action, printers have put ink to paper in the struggle for peace and justice. Political posters held a venerable position as one of the principal modes of dissent in the nineteenth century, and they were widespread during the 1930s and 1940s until the chilling atmosphere of McCarthyism in the 1950s stifled the voices of protest. Their popularity and importance in the United States was revived during the civil rights and anti-Vietnam War movements, and posters continue to enliven movements for social change today.

Produced by the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, in conjunction with the Progressive Printers Network, this exhibition presents prints from print shops throughout the United States and Canada addressing issues ranging from women's rights to the anti-Apartheid movement. By focusing on the printshops, the exhibition examines a unique approach to organizing for social change through collective work.
Above: David Fichter, Decade of Social Change 1974-1984, 1984. Offset print. Red Sun Press, Boston, MA.

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