It's not personal and Earth Ruminations

by - August 17, 2018



It's not personal
Work by Katie Hargrave
Reception Friday, August 24, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Work on display August 17-September 19
Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery
Main Gallery
Christian Brothers University

Katie Hargrave is a professor at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. She received her MFA in Intermedia from the University of Iowa, MA from Brandeis University, and BFA from the University of Illinois. Her work has been shown at DIY spaces, university galleries, non-profits, and festivals. She is a member of the collaborative groups “The Think Tank that has yet to be named” and “Like Riding a Bicycle.”

"I am interested in systems as broad as politics, history, our built environment, and our learning systems," Hargrave says. "The act of exploring, deconstructing, and decoding these systems is political, if subtly. We all have power; we all own this world.

"I make projects using a variety of forms — installations, publications, videos, and events — that encourage audiences to become participants in research and production as a way to explore their own experiences, their histories, their challenges. My work is responsive to environments, develops over time, and is co-created with participants as well as collaborators. Together, we can begin to realize that the construction of systems is made up of collective energy, and we might begin to ask: whose energy?"


Earth Ruminations
Work by Gustavo Plascencia
Reception Friday, August 24, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Work on display August 17-September 19
Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery
Gallery Foyer
Christian Brothers University

Gustavo Plascencia was raised in the northern Mexican state of Coahuila. He attended the Escuela de Artes Plasticas Ruben Herrera in Saltillo, Coahuila, before immigrating to the USA. He received his MFA at the University of Colorado in Boulder in Photography and Media Arts and his BFA from the University of Texas at Arlington. Plascencia’s work has been shown at both national and international venues, including Museo de Las Americas (Denver, CO), Instituto de Artes de Medellin (Medellin, Colombia), the International Center of Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Palestine), Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Valencia, Spain), the Academia de Bellas Artes San Carlos (Mexico City, Mexico) and the Universidad Eafit (Medellin, Colombia). He has participated in artist-in-residency programs at the Instituto de Artes de Medellin (Colombia/2009), Arte Studio Ginestrelle (Assisi, Italy/2011), Contemporary Artists Center in (Troy, NY/2011), Brush Creek Foundations for the Arts (Saratoga, WY/2012), and the Old School Residence (Bulgaria/2012).

"My artwork deals with borders, both real and imagined; for the  Earth Ruminations series, I gathered images and objects directly from the environment I inhabit," Plascencia says. "I used this data to explore my fascination with nature, social memory of the landscape, and the similaraties between scientific and artistic processes. Earth Ruminations, presents images made using traditional, alternative, and hybrid photographic processes such as lumen prints and cyanotypes; I sometimes scanned them half way through the process to capture the in-between stages of the process to highlight the ephemeral nature of my data collection and its contents.

I used organic materials to create these images; yet these images are reminiscent of turn-of-the-century sky and space imagery. Are we looking at the skies, or are they bodies of water? Are the images depicting something microscopic or immense? This data collection process yields images that are very abstract, but yet they reference the past or a possible future. The disappeared, the lost, and the wished collide in these naturally imagined landscapes and its inhabitants. The people that walked these places in the past have left a mark in the environment — for better or worse — and now we can be part of those narratives and share our histories by inhabiting the same spaces. My creative research heavily borrows from social practices in art and contemporary philosophy; these influences have led me to explore intersections of place, personal narratives, and the absence of the body; anchoring these experiences with the notion that place/landscape is a silent witness to the histories that affect an individual on a personal and a communal level."

You May Also Like

0 comments